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Controls Common to Many Windows

Contents

Screen Shot (More)

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This is what you get in the More version of this window (you use the More button to show it).

Add Melodic Sequence or Chord Progression

Make new "instruments" that play melodic sequences or chord progressions.

Select one of these into any of the parts and it will play your sequence or chord progression over and over - stepping through it for each new note in the rhythm.

You can have any number of these playing at once in your rhythm, in different parts, each moving to its next new note or chord for each new note in the part.

Add this chord sequence to the menu as a new instrument (button)

Adds your melodic seqeunce or chord progression as a new instrument, which you can then select in the Melodic Chords and Sequences drop menu. Replaces it if already there...

It identifies the instrument by name - and you can tell if it is already there if you can see the "Remove" button.

The name is made up using the first line of your chord progression - and your optional description if any - and the words (Notes), (Chords), Transpose, etc.

WHAT INSTRUMENT DOES IT USE TO PLAY THE CHORDS OR NOTES?

For the instrument to play the chords or sequence - it uses whatever instrument you have currently selected to use with your PC keyboard - so long as it is melodic - if it's a custom multi instrument then it uses the first instrument in it.

HOW TO CHANGE THE INSTRUMENT TO PLAY THE CHORDS OR SEQUENCE

To change the instrument played, then select your chord progression into any of the parts in the rhythm, then go to Instruments (Ctrl + 8) or Template:W

Make sure you have "keep chord progression" selected (if you don't see this make sure you have highlighted the part with your chord progression in Show All Parts (Ctrl + 9) ) - and then select whatever instrument you want to use to play your progression.

This is a permanent change, the same instrument will be used again for y our chords or seqeunece in future, and in all the parts of the rhythm that use this chord or melodic sequence.

If you want to have several different instruments in play each playing the same melodic sequence - then make clones which you can do in Multi Instruments Menu (Ctrl + 37) and select a different clone in each part.

You can also change the instrument to play the chords directly, from Multi Instruments Menu (Ctrl + 37) using it's "Edit Instrument".

Remove... (button)

Removes your new instrument from the menu.

Play as MELODY - ignore chords (check box)

When this is selected, any chord symbols are ignored, e.g. C, Cm, Cdim7 are all treated as the single root note, same as C1..

. This makes it easy to write melody lines - no need to keep adding 1 as in C1 D1 E1 etc. If you want to mix in a few chords as well prefix them with z as e.g.

C D zE

will play C1 D1 E (as a major chord)

Instruments (Ctrl + 8)

Melodic Instruments (Keyboard users - use Alt a second time to get to menu)...

Use this menu to change the instrument for the currently highlighted parts in Show All Parts (Ctrl + 9).

Select an instrument from the menu or enter its name into the text box.

If you want to use the same instrument for all the parts in the Parts window, switch on the Select for all parts check box .

Accidentals symbols and special opts (Ctrl + 61)

Notation for note names for the chords

Sequences and Chords - drop menu. Select any instrument from this menu to COPY HERE (button)

This is a drop menu of all your Custom instruments which use melodic sequences or chord progressions - you can also find this menu under "Sequences and Chords" in Instruments (Ctrl + 8)...

For the complete list of custom instruments see Multi Instruments Menu (Ctrl + 37) which is also where you go to edit the instruments in detail - there are several other options there which you will probably need only rarely.

You can also clone any of the instruments to use as a starting point for new ones - and it is easy to delete the instruments as well.

Enter note names such as C, Eb, F# etc, or ratios 5/4 or cents 250.0 etc - or chords C, Cm, C7, Cdim7, etc

Note names can be done in 72 equal notation

C C^ C> C] C#< C#v D# etc

- a few other notations available in Accidentals symbols and special opts (Ctrl + 61)

Recognised chords include C, Cm, C7, Cdim7, Cm7, Csus2, Cadd9, and any other similarly constructed chord symbols + various microtonal options

Prefix forward and back slash (/ and \) to raise or lower by octaves.

Prefix full stop (.) for inversions...

SUMMARY

Prefix / (up) or \ (down) to raise and lower chords by octaves.

Prefix full stop for inversion - takes the bottom note of the chord and shifts it up an octave. So .G7 is the first inversion, ..G7 is the second inversion and so on.

Make sure you have Auto Invert switched off for this - or you will get unexpected inversions for some chords.

Prefix ~ to shift the notes in the other direction, takes top note of the chord and shifts it down an octave. So ~G7 is the same as \...G7

You can enter the chord in either roman numeral notation or using note letters.

MICROTONAL CHORDS=

If you use the microtonal notations - be sure to select "Don't quantize pitches" to play them at the correct pitches.

Or alternatively, you can use quantize to scale and make sure the scale includes all the pitches you want to use - this is sometimes useful. More about this below.

EXAMPLES

PACHELBEL'S CANON CHORDS

D \A \B \F# \G \D \G \A

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pachelbel's_Canon

LA FOLIA CHORDS

For a part with 4 beats to a bar:

Dm = = = A7 = = =

Dm = = = C = = =

F = = = C = = =

Dm = = = A7 = = =

Dm = = = A7 = = =

Dm = = = C = = =

F = = = C = = =

Dm = A7 = Dm = = =

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folia

GREENSLEEVES CHORDS

Am C G Em Am = E =

Am C G Em Am E7 Am =

C = G Em Am = E =

C = G Em Am E7 Am =

12 BAR BLUES CHORDS

For this, select the measurebeat part as the part to play chords - so you get the one chord at start of each bar.

I IV I I7

IV IV7 I I7

V IV I V7

or

C F C C7

F F7 C C7

G F C G7

(this is with the V7 turn around at the end)

or same one in E:

E A E E7

A A7 E E7

B A E B7

Or, for a more complex progression changing chord in middle of a bar:

I7 = = =

IV7 = IVdim =

I7 = Vm7 =

I7 = = =

IV7 = = =

IVdim = = =

I7 = = =

III7 VI7

IIm7 = = =

V7 = = =

III7 = VI7 =

II7 = V7 =

For this one, then you select the part that plays four beats to the bar for the chord progression part. beat part, e.g. part 1 for 4/4 or part 2 for 4/4 with two subdivsions.

Wikipedia article about twelve bar blues: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twelve-bar_blues - and lots of tutorials on youtube.

TRANSPOSING

To adjust the key vary the pitch of the "1/1" in Pitch of 1/1 of Scale (Ctrl + 10) - this is used for the pitch of the root for the I chord in the progression.

Make sure you have "TRANSPOSE to "Pitch of 1/1" switched on.

Note that this also transposes the chords to the notes played if you play them from PC keyboard, midi keyboard or following the melodic line of a fractal tune. So - to play as a chord progression with no transpositions except to the pitch of the 1/1, make sure you have the melody seed set to 0s throughout in Beats volumes and times (Ctrl + 76) or Beats As Text (Ctrl + 77).

How this works, is that Pitch of 1/1 of Scale (Ctrl + 10) sets the pitch of the "C" if you use the C7 type notation.

So if you set the pitch of the 1/1 to, say, E in Pitch of 1/1 of Scale (Ctrl + 10) then it will display as a C and play as an E.

If you play the same piece in different keys then the roman numerals type notation may be easier to use.

ROMAN NUMERALS SUCH AS V7, II7 ETC

There are two ways to interpret these. Normally assumes you use the popular form of the roman numerals notation, as used as e.g. the notation for 12 bar blues - where I7 and IV7 have a minor seventh like all the other seventh chords.

In this notation a I7 in the key of C major has a Bb in it.

In classical form of this notation then the notes have to fit the key so the I7 and IV7 have a major seventh while the other seventh chords have a minor seventh.

So in this version of the same notation a I7 in the key of C has a B natural. If that's what you want then you can switch off the popular notation in the More version of this window.

EXAMPLE CHORDS

You can use just about any chord symbol used for chord progressions. Here are a few examples:

C, Cm, Csus2, Csus4, Cadd2, Cadd9, Cadd4, Cmadd2, Cmadd9, Cmadd4, Cadd2add4, Cmadd2add4, Caug, Cdim, Cdim7, C5, C6, Cm6, C6/9, Cm6/9, C6/7, Cm6/7, Cmaj6/7, C7, Cm7, Cmaj7, C7sus4, C7sus2, C7add4, Cm7add4, C9, Cm9, Cmaj9, C9sus4, C11, Cm11, Cmaj11, C13, Cm13, Cmaj13, C13sus4, Cmmaj7, CmM7, Cmmaj9, CmM9, C7#9, C7b9, C7#5, C7b5, Cm7#5, Cm7b5, Cmaj7#5, Cmaj7b5, C9#5, C9b5, C7aug9, C7dim9, C7aug5, C7dim5, Cm7aug5, Cm7dim5, Cmaj7aug5, Cmaj7dim5, C9aug5, C9dim5.

If you need information about the chord naming system see

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chord_names_and_symbols_(jazz_and_pop_music%29

Or use one of the various on-line chord finders such as this one:

http://www.piano-chords.net/

or a more complete list at:

http://chordlist.brian-amberg.de/en/guitar/standard/C/bb.html

http://ionian.musicbypatterns.com/mode/ionian/key_of_a_flat_major/c/dim/c_dim_chord_piano.html

The chords are transposed so that C is transposed to the "Pitch of 1/1" in Pitch of 1/1 of Scale (Ctrl + 10) and all the other notes are transposed accordingly

You can use the same symbols with the roman numerals, e.g. I7sus2 or whatever.

INVERSIONS AND OCTAVE SHIFTS

To play the inversion of a chord you place a full stop before the symbol. So .G7 is the first inversion, ..G7 is the second inversion and so on.

You can also use ~ to go the other way so ~G7 would play f g e b in that order. (same as third inversion shifted down an octave in this case).

You can also shift up or down by octaves using / (up) or \ (down), so ~G7 is the same as /...G7. Symbols can be repeated as needed so // shifts up two octaves and \\ shifts down two octaves, and indeed these symbols can be combined together in any order.

I don't know of any standard ascii way of notating these inversions and octave shifts, so this is a notation that was made up to suit the requirements.

To give a few examples (using the notation where notes in increasing octaves are C C' C c c' c),

/G7 would be g' e' b' f

/.G7 would be e' b' f' g

\~G7 would be F G B d

\~~G7 would be D F G B

An example progression might be:

I ~V I ~IV I

Trouble shooting tip: There must be no spaces at all within a symbol, as the chord progression player uses spaces (alternatively dashes or commas) to distinguish the successive chords in the list.

So \~G7 is correct, but \~ G7 is not because of the space between the ~ and the G.

As an alternative octaving symbol, you can use [ and ]

It is [ to lower and ] to raise.

So [G7 is G7 lowered by an octave and ]G7 is G7 raised by an octave.

MICROTONAL CHORDS=

As I said above, be sure to select "Don't quantize pitches" .

Or - set the scale appropriately. For instance if you set the scale to 53 equal - then all the chord pitches will be quantized to the nearet 53-et pitch to the notated pitches.

If you want to play chords in some historical tuning or other near to twelve equal tuning (e.g. the Indian just intonation twelve tone scale) - then you can simply use normal chord symbols - choose the 12 tone tuning you want - and then use quantize to scale.

You can also use ratios or cents notation to add individual pitches to a chord symbol.

E.g. C0@5/4 plays a 5/4 above the pitch of the 1/1, and nothing else. You can add more notes, in cents or ratios notation, to complete your chord - and as before - either quantize it to the scale, or use the exact pitches.

You have the same chords as for the Bounce metronome Chord Progression Player:

http://robertinventor.com/software/tunesmithy/chord_progression_player.htm

and in more detail:

http://robertinventor.com/software/tunesmithy/help/chord_progr_player.htm

So you can also use the microtonal notations such as

Cj for just intonation C chord 1/1 5/4 3/2

Similarly Cj7, Cjm etc.

For harmonic series chord then

Ch7 for 1/1 5/4 3/2 7/4

Ch13 for 1/1 5/4 3/2 7/4 9/8 11/8 13/8

These just intonation chords sound very harmonious on their own but may be tricky to dovetail together when you use them in chord progressions, because they don't use equal temperament so e.g. an Ej rooted on the twelve tone equal E will have its root slightly sharper than the major third of Cj.

Show in Arpeggio window... (button)

Recognised chords include C, Cm, C7, Cdim7, Cm7, Csus2, Cadd9, etc + various microtonal options

Prefix forward and back slash (/ and \) to raise or lower by octaves.

Prefix full stop (.) for inversions

Note names can be the ordinary twelve tone names - or else - 72 equal notation C, C^, C> C], C#<, C#v,etc with some other microtonal options available, and you can also build up any chord using notes in ratios or cents notation...

SUMMARY

Prefix / (up) or \\ (down) to raise and lower chords by octaves.

Prefix full stop for inversion - takes the bottom note of the chord and shifts it up an octave. So .G7 is the first inversion, ..G7 is the second inversion and so on.

Make sure you have Auto Invert switched off for this - or you will get unexpected inversions for some chords.

Prefix ~ to shift the notes in the other direction, takes top note of the chord and shifts it down an octave. So ~G7 is the same as \\...G7

You can enter the chord in either roman numeral notation or using note letters.

MICROTONAL CHORDS=

If you use the microtonal notations - be sure to select "Don't quantize pitches" to play them at the correct pitches.

Or alternatively, you can use quantize to scale and make sure the scale includes all the pitches you want to use - this is sometimes useful. More about this below.

EXAMPLES

PACHELBEL'S CANON CHORDS

D \\A \\B \\F# \\G \\D \\G \\A

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pachelbel's_Canon

LA FOLIA CHORDS

Dm\tab A7\tab Dm\tab C\tab F\tab C\tab Dm\tab A7

Dm\tab A7\tab Dm\tab C\tab F\tab C\tab Dm A7\tab Dm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folia

GREENSLEEVES CHORDS

Am C G Em Am = E =

Am C G Em Am E7 Am =

C = G Em Am = E =

C = G Em Am E7 Am =

12 BAR BLUES CHORDS

For this, select the measurebeat part as the part to play chords - so you get the one chord at start of each bar.

I IV I I7

IV IV7 I I7

V IV I V7

\lang2057 or

\lang1033 C F C C7

F F7 C C7

G F C G7

(this is with the V7 turn around at the end)

or same one in E:

E A E E7

A A7 E E7

B A E B7

Or, for a more complex progression changing chord in middle of a bar:

I7 = = =

IV7 = IVdim =

I7 = Vm7 =

I7 = = =

IV7 = = =

IVdim = = =\tab

I7 = = =

III7 VI7

IIm7 = = =

V7 = = =

III7 = VI7 =

II7 = V7 =

For this one, then you select the part that plays four beats to the bar for the chord progression part. beat part, e.g. part 1 for 4/4 or part 2 for 4/4 with two subdivsions.

Wikipedia article about twelve bar blues: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twelve-bar_blues - and lots of tutorials on youtube.

TRANSPOSING

To adjust the key vary the pitch of the "1/1" in \{\{w10\}\} - this is used for the pitch of the root for the I chord in the progression.

Make sure you have "TRANSPOSE to "Pitch of 1/1" switched on.

Note that this also transposes the chords to the notes played if you play them from PC keyboard, midi keyboard or following the melodic line of a fractal tune. So - to play as a chord progression with no transpositions except to the pitch of the 1/1, make sure you have the melody seed set to 0s throughout in \{\{w76\}\} or \{\{w77\}\}.

How this works, is that \{\{w10\}\} sets the pitch of the "C" if you use the C7 type notation.

So if you set the pitch of the 1/1 to, say, E in \{\{w10\}\} then it will display as a C and play as an E.

If you play the same piece in different keys then the roman numerals type notation may be easier to use.

ROMAN NUMERALS SUCH AS V7, II7 ETC

There are two ways to interpret these. Normally assumes you use the popular form of the roman numerals notation, as used as e.g. the notation for 12 bar blues - where I7 and IV7 have a minor seventh like all the other seventh chords.

In this notation a I7 in the key of C major has a Bb in it.

In classical form of this notation then the notes have to fit the key so the I7 and IV7 have a major seventh while the other seventh chords have a minor seventh.

So in this version of the same notation a I7 in the key of C has a B natural. If that's what you want then you can switch off the popular notation in the More version of this window.

EXAMPLE CHORDS

You can use just about any chord symbol used for chord progressions. Here are a few examples:

C, Cm, Csus2, Csus4, Cadd2, Cadd9, Cadd4, Cmadd2, Cmadd9, Cmadd4, Cadd2add4, Cmadd2add4, Caug, Cdim, Cdim7, C5, C6, Cm6, C6/9, Cm6/9, C6/7, Cm6/7, Cmaj6/7, C7, Cm7, Cmaj7, C7sus4, C7sus2, C7add4, Cm7add4, C9, Cm9, Cmaj9, C9sus4, C11, Cm11, Cmaj11, C13, Cm13, Cmaj13, C13sus4, Cmmaj7, CmM7, Cmmaj9, CmM9, C7#9, C7b9, C7#5, C7b5, Cm7#5, Cm7b5, Cmaj7#5, Cmaj7b5, C9#5, C9b5, C7aug9, C7dim9, C7aug5, C7dim5, Cm7aug5, Cm7dim5, Cmaj7aug5, Cmaj7dim5, C9aug5, C9dim5.

If you need information about the chord naming system see

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chord_names_and_symbols_(jazz_and_pop_music%29

Or use one of the various on-line chord finders such as this one:

http://www.piano-chords.net/

or a more complete list at:

http://chordlist.brian-amberg.de/en/guitar/standard/C/bb.html

http://ionian.musicbypatterns.com/mode/ionian/key_of_a_flat_major/c/dim/c_dim_chord_piano.html

The chords are transposed so that C is transposed to the "Pitch of 1/1" in \{\{w10\}\} and all the other notes are transposed accordingly

You can use the same symbols with the roman numerals, e.g. I7sus2 or whatever.

INVERSIONS AND OCTAVE SHIFTS

To play the inversion of a chord you place a full stop before the symbol. So .G7 is the first inversion, ..G7 is the second inversion and so on.

You can also use ~ to go the other way so ~G7 would play f g e b in that order. (same as third inversion shifted down an octave in this case).

You can also shift up or down by octaves using / (up) or \\ (down), so ~G7 is the same as /...G7. Symbols can be repeated as needed so // shifts up two octaves and \\\\ shifts down two octaves, and indeed these symbols can be combined together in any order.

I don't know of any standard ascii way of notating these inversions and octave shifts, so this is a notation that was made up to suit the requirements.

To give a few examples (using the notation where notes in increasing octaves are C C' C c c' c),

/G7 would be g' e' b' f

/.G7 would be e' b' f' g

\\~G7 would be F G B d

\\~~G7 would be D F G B

An example progression might be:

I ~V I ~IV I

Trouble shooting tip: There must be no spaces at all within a symbol, as the chord progression player uses spaces (alternatively dashes or commas) to distinguish the successive chords in the list.

So \\~G7 is correct, but \\~ G7 is not because of the space between the ~ and the G.

As an alternative octaving symbol, you can use [ and ]

It is [ to lower and ] to raise.

So [G7 is G7 lowered by an octave and ]G7 is G7 raised by an octave.

MICROTONAL CHORDS=

As I said above, be sure to select "Don't quantize pitches" .

Or - set the scale appropriately. For instance if you set the scale to 53 equal - then all the chord pitches will be quantized to the nearet 53-et pitch to the notated pitches.

If you want to play chords in some historical tuning or other near to twelve equal tuning (e.g. the Indian just intonation twelve tone scale) - then you can simply use normal chord symbols - choose the 12 tone tuning you want - and then use quantize to scale.

You can also use ratios or cents notation to add individual pitches to a chord symbol.

E.g. C0@5/4 plays a 5/4 above the pitch of the 1/1, and nothing else. You can add more notes, in cents or ratios notation, to complete your chord - and as before - either quantize it to the scale, or use the exact pitches.

You have the same chords as for the Bounce metronome Chord Progression Player:

http://robertinventor.com/software/tunesmithy/chord_progression_player.htm

and in more detail:

http://robertinventor.com/software/tunesmithy/help/chord_progr_player.htm

So you can also use the microtonal notations such as

Cj for just intonation C chord 1/1 5/4 3/2

Similarly Cj7, Cjm etc.

For harmonic series chord then

Ch7 for 1/1 5/4 3/2 7/4

Ch13 for 1/1 5/4 3/2 7/4 9/8 11/8 13/8

These just intonation chords sound very harmonious on their own but may be tricky to dovetail together when you use them in chord progressions, because they don't use equal temperament so e.g. an Ej rooted on the twelve tone equal E will have its root slightly sharper than the major third of Cj.

# (number) Play Arpeggio (button) (Alt + #)

Play the chord progression - as chords, broken chords or sequences...

To configure which of these you play, use the double quaver play options button Options for Seed, Arpeggio and Scale Play buttons (Ctrl + 28).

Options for Seed, Arpeggio and Scale Play buttons (Ctrl + 28)

Configure what the play buttons do for chords, arpeggio and scale playback - including ascending, descending, both ways, and figurations

For chords, can choose to play arpeggiated, broken chords or chords

and more...

Play selected chord (radio button)

When you press play button, it plays the selected chord

Play all (radio button)

Play button plays the entire progression

Show All Parts (Ctrl + 9)

Set instruments to play for Bounce metronome parts, volumes for parts etc...

You can set up any part with an instrument, volume, and other parameters here. More parameters are available in the First Highlighted Part - Properties (Ctrl + 176) window.

This part then can be used in many places in Bounce metronome. It is for most purposes, equivalent to a Midi Out channel in other music programs.

Parts... (editable)

This is the part that gets changed when you vary the instrument, volume etc

Same as highlighted part in Show All Parts (Ctrl + 9)....

If you change the highlight in other windows, such as Pitch of 1/1 of Scale (Ctrl + 10), it makes no diference to this number. You have to highlight the part in Show All Parts (Ctrl + 9) or adjust this number by hand. That's because you might want to change the pan, say, for a different part from the part you have currently highlighted in the Parts window.

If you highlight more than one part in the Parts window, this number shows the number of the first highlighted part.

However, all the highlighted parts in the Parts window get changed when you change the instrument or other settings for the highlighted part.

If you want to change all the parts in one go, highlight them all in the Parts window or select the ALL check box.

This is also the part for the PC keyboard and mouse if you have it set to the standard settings - you change that from On Screen Keyboards - Volume Sensitivity etc (Ctrl + 24)

This highlighted part is also used to play the Seed, Scale and Arpeggio for fractal tunes, with the default settings. Another place to configure it is in Options for Seed, Arpeggio and Scale Play buttons (Ctrl + 28)

ALL parts (check box)

When this is selected, the instrument gets selected in all the parts.

AUTO TRANSPOSE this chord seqeunce to "Pitch of 1/1" and Pitch played (check box)

Lets you transpose the chords or notes using Pitch of 1/1 of Scale (Ctrl + 10)

Also transposes them to the note played in the melody or on PC Keyboard...

When this is selected - then you only get the chord progression as written if you set the 1/1 to C in Pitch of 1/1 of Scale (Ctrl + 10) and play the chords with the melody seed in Beats volumes and times (Ctrl + 76) or Beats As Text (Ctrl + 77) set to 0 for every note.

However it can be very useful in that case - because it lets you transpose the entire chord progression easily using Pitch of 1/1 of Scale (Ctrl + 10).

Also means that by assigning just a single chord, say C, that gives you a major chord on every single note in the PC Keyboard player in PC Keyboard Player (Ctrl + 112).

In other situations though you may prefer to have this switched off - so - that's why it's an optional setting.

Don't quantize chord pitches (radio button)

This plays the pitches exactly as notated. Default is 72 equal which lets C, C#, Db etc play the familiar twelve equal pitches while adding extra accidentals symbols for more "in between" accidentals.

You can choose other notation systems in Accidentals symbols and special opts (Ctrl + 61)

Quantise to scale (radio button)

Quantizes pitches in the chords to the scale or tuning system you set up in Scales Drop List (Ctrl + 110)...

For a simple example - if you choose a historical well tempering in Scales Drop List (Ctrl + 110), then all the chords will be played tempered to that historical tuning.

Quantise to arpeggio (radio button)

Rarely used feature, quantizes all the chord notes to the "Arpeggio" in Arpeggios Drop List (Ctrl + 109)

For instance if arpeggio is set to PENTATONIC - then all notes are moved to the nearest pitch in the pentatonic scale.

If unsure - DON'T USE THIS - but some microtonalists may find it useful for some tunings with large numbers of pitches in them, for instance with various choices of "arpeggio" they can use for the twelve tone pitches

Add chords to description (check box)

Adds the chords as far as the first end of line in the list of chords

AUTO INVERT (check box)

Let the chords be inverted - you don't care which inversion is used...

It is done so that the inverted chords all use a similar range of pitches - chords that span less than an octave will be inverted if necessary until they only use notes in the first octave above the 1/1.

For the Chords for PC keyboard keys (Ctrl + 172) window - that's how it works if you have the option to transpose all the PC keyboard chords to notes played switched off. When the chords get transposed, they work similarly, but inverted if necessary so that they only use notes in the first octave above the note to be played.

BROKEN chords (when played in rhythm or tune) (check box)

Broken chords - so you get the original note, then the first note in the harmony, then the second and so on one after another...

After the notes sound they remain sustaining until you release the key.

Time step (editable)

Time step between the notes for broken chords...

Either the actual time between the notes in seconds - or the time adjusted to the tempo if you have Adjusted to tempo switched on.

For time adjusted to tempo, then this number is in seconds when the tempo for the part is 60, and increased or decreased accordingly, so is in fractions of the beat for the part. For bar beat part, then it's fractions of a bar.

So for example if you play the chords on the bar beat (i.e. set part to the bar beat part) then this number is in fractions of a bar.

You can use fractions e.g.

1/4

for a time step of a quarter of the beat for the part.

Adjusted to tempo (check box)

If you switch this on, the broken chords are played faster if you set the entire Lambdoma to a faster tempo in the main window...

It will then play with the given note length if tempo is set to 60. Set the tempo to e.g. 120 and the broken chords are played twice as fast, and so on.

Multi Instruments Menu (Ctrl + 37)

This let's you make a new "custom instrument" consisting of any number of the available melodic or percussion instruments playing together

You can set them up so some of the instruments skip beats - in cycles - and so set up complex patterns if you wish - also they can play chords (for pitched instruments).

You can then select these multi instruments into any of the parts from Instruments (Ctrl + 8) or Non Melodic Percussion (Ctrl + 21)

Arpeggios Drop List (Ctrl + 109)

Show a list of arpeggios to select from - and edit the list....

The arpeggio is a selection of entries from a scale. For instance if you have a twelve tone scale, the arpeggio could be a major scale, pentatonic scale, dominant seventh, major, minor chord etc. The notes can be in any order. However, in most cases it is easiest to use an arpeggio with the notes in ascending order.

You can use this to choose another arpeggio or edit the arpeggio. If the main window has a drop list of arpeggios already, then this window is a copy of it shown as a list rather than a drop list. It also has extra buttons to configure it.

Scales Drop List (Ctrl + 110)

Show a list of scales to select from - and edit the list....

The scale consists of the pitches to use for your tunes, usually as intervals in cents or ratios from a beginning pitch called the 1/1. See the help for the Scale field for more information.

You can use this to choose another scale. If the main window has a drop list of scales already, then this window is a copy of it shown in the form of a list rather than a drop list, It also has extra buttons to configure it.

Navigation (bottom of page)

Previous: Lattice Scale

Next: Chord Progression For Part
Controls Common to Many Windows

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