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Just Intonation Retuning with pitch shifts

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Just Intonation Retuning with pitch shifts

Just Intonation Retuning with pitch shifts

Options for the just intonation retuning with pitch shifts

Retune to just intonation harmony, with pitch shifting

This retunes chords to pure harmonies in any scale with pitch shifts...

The chords will all be pure but the consequence of this in many scales is that notes shift about as you move from one chord to the next. You can configure how this works.

Example, if you play a C then an E a pure 5/4 above it (i.e. pitched in tune with the fifth harmonic) then it will be about 14 cents flat in equal temperament. If you then play a G# above that then the C a 5/4 above that, it will then be very noticeably flat compared with the original C (nearly a quarter tone flat).

Try that out with this option switched on - and overlap each note with just the next one - and you will hear how it works. Be sure to overlap each note only with the next one, and not leave the first C sounding throughout.

Then, when you get to the final C, listen to its pitch. Then release it and play it again after a pause of a second or two and it will play at its original pitch which is very noticeably sharper. This works because this option is set up to reset notes to the original pitch during pauses of half a second or more - configured from the J.I. opts window.

Numbers to use in chord interval ratios

List all numbers to use E.g. 5/4 only used if 5 and 4 are both acceptable...

So for instance if you want a tritone 45/32 to be acceptable, then you should add a 32 and a 45 here. The 3 (or 9) and 5 alone aren't enough to accept 45 as well, you have to list all the actual numbers you want to be acceptable, not just factors of them.

Additional OK chord intervals

Enter any extra ratios you want in chords...

Example, suppose you want supermajor and subminor chords - ones with 9/7, and 7/6, but you want to leave out some other chords involving 7 (septimal harmonies) such as 1/1 5/4 7/4.

In that case, it's no good adding a 7 to the list of acceptable numbers as that will add in 7/4, 7/5 etc, all the ratios with 7s in them.

Instead just add 7/6 and 9/7 here in this list of acceptable ratios.

You can also use this to add in favourite ratios that otherwise won't get accepted because they are too complex.

Allow gradual drift between dovetailed chords during pauses

Set low to exclude complex ratios like 9/7 etc....

The way this works depends on whether you have it set to Wilson's additive complexity or not.

For the additive version see the help for that check box.

With it unselected, the complexity is just the result of multiplying the two numbers together.

So for example, 9/7 has complexity 9*7 = 63.

The way this works depends on whether you have it set to ignore powers of 2 in top and bottom. See the help for that option for details.

Allow gradual drift between dovetailed chords during pauses - SPIN

Increase or decrease the max complexity

Allow gradual drift between dovetailed chords during pauses - SPIN

Increase or decrease the max complexity ten at a time

Ignore 2s

Select this to use complexities up to octave equivalence.

..

The complexity here is the result of adding the numbers that make up the ratio, or alternatively multiplying them if you unselect the additive complexity check box.

So for example, 9/7 has complexity 9+7 = 12.

If you select this option, it is done up to octave equivalence - i.e. if either of the numbers is even, you divide the numbers by two first (repeatedly if necessary) until you get to an odd number before working it out.

So 9/7 has complexity 9+7 = 12. So has 18/7, and 9/14 as they are the same up to octave equivalence.

Other examples: 5/4 has complexity 5 (same as 5/1)

6/5 has complexity 15 as it is the same as 3/5 up to octave equivalence.

So, if you shift any of the notes in the chord up or down by octaves, it doesn't affect the complexity of any of the intervals between notes in the chord.

If you leave this option switched off, then 5/3 is considered less complex than 6/5, or 13/1 less complex than 13/8 and so on - in some of these cases when you ignore octave equivalence, those intervals with low complexity do tend to be a little more harmonious sounding in harmonic timbres, but it is a bit rough and ready. You can fine tune it by adding additional acceptable ratios.

With it switched off, if you have the Additive (Wilson) method selected, then the power of the two only is used, e.g. 13/8 would have complexity 13 + 3 (because 8 is the third power of 2) rather than 13 + 6 (for 2 + 2 + 2) - see the help for that option for more details.

This is a complex subject and much researched - there are more advanced measures of harmonic complexity than this such as Paul Erlich's harmonic entropy theory, but they are not implemented in FTS at present.

Set Max complexity

Set low to exclude complex ratios like 9/7 etc....

The way this works depends on whether you have it set to Wilson's additive complexity or not.

For the additive version see the help for that check box.

With it unselected, the complexity is just the result of multiplying the two numbers together.

So for example, 9/7 has complexity 9*7 = 63.

The way this works depends on whether you have it set to ignore powers of 2 in top and bottom. See the help for that option for details.

Help = F1

Click for help for this window. Or F1. Other opts: Shift , Alt, Ctrl + click...

F1 or click shows the help for the current window in your web browser.

Some windows may have no help yet in which case the help icon is shown crossed out with a red line.

Shift + F1 or Shift + Click brings up the tool tips extra help window (this window) to show any extra help for a tool tip.

You can tell if a tool tip has extra help if it ends ... like this one.

Ctrl + F1 or Ctrl + click takes you to the list of keyboard shortcuts for Tune Smithy.

Alt + F1 or Alt + click (alternatively Caps lock physically held down + F1 or Click) takes you to the on-line page at the robertinventor.com web site about the current main window task - which gives a short introduction to it for newbies to the program. If there is no on-line page specific to a task, takes you to the main tune smithy page on the web site.

Since the help for Tune Smithy is currently a bit out of date and needs to be redone completely for the new 3.0 release, then you may find the on-line page for some of the newer tasks particularly useful.

Organise Windows = F2

Reset, or Save settings for this window. RIGHT CLICK for all windows menu...

Shows the Organise windows window - which you can use to reset all the parameters for the current window.

You can also use it to save the settings for just this window, or open previously saved parameters for just this window.

Also has a drop list of all the windows and their shortcuts, and related options - some to do with the menu listing, and some to do with window resizing and minimising.

Other Dialog Star

Tip of the day - For All category - right click for neighbouring windows...

Left click for a tip of the day in this category.

Right click to see a menu of neighbouring windows.

The neighbours are the ones you most often move to after this one or within a minute of this one, arranged by popularity.

So as you continue to use FTS, it will learn your habits, and the neighbouring windows listed here, should be the ones you most often visit after this one.

Neighbours, and Previous - Up - Next

Parts (Ctrl + 9)

N.B. This list of neighbours may change when these pages are updated.

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